Guide for Fine Art

In the modern world people hardly find any time to visit museums, exhibitions and other cultural events. However, there are occasions when we want to impress the others with our deep knowledge of artists and their works, even if we have only the slightest idea about the difference between Monet and Manet. To avoid ridiculous situations use this simple and efficient guide through the jungles of fine art and different genres of painting.

If you see on the picture dark background and anguished face expressions you are most likely to meet one of works of a great Titian. Probably, the only exception of this rule is his “Venus of Urbino” which looks pretty happy and satisfied with life, so you better memorize this image in order not to mix it with works of Rubens. By the way, Rubens can be recognized thanks to a great number of naked appetizing figures with cellulite on his pictures.

If the men on the pictures resemble languid curly Italian women, it is creations of Karavadjo.

If you see a great number of small human figures, it is Briegel. If these small people are painted together with some additional strange stuff, like surreal constructions, it is Bosch.

If there are some merry amours or sheep on the picture or they can be easily added without the fear of damaging the composition, there are two options possible – it can be either Bushe or Vato.

A ballet dancer on the picture means that it was painted by Degas.

If you observe something contrasty and bluish and everybody has thin beardy faces, it is undoubtedly El Greco.

If everybody is beautiful and has figures which make you look at the picture over and over again you are likely to find one of Michelangelo’s works.

Finally, let’s return to Monet and Manet. Just remember, that Monet painted mainly obscure spots, and Manet pictured people. Besides, the former was called Claude, and the latter had the name Edouard.

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